History

Recognizing that low-income residents living in subsidized housing under the Housing Opportunities Commission (HOC) were experiencing a variety of unmet social service needs, leaders from HOC and the general community teamed together in 1999 to form Community Partners, in order to create targeted programs to help families with children, seniors and people with disabilities living in subsidized housing improve their quality of life.

Our programs help to equip low-income children to succeed in school, help homeless families obtain permanent housing, assist low-income working families with purchasing refurbished vehicles, teach unemployed HOC residents the necessary skills for success in the job market, transition foster youth to independent living and increase the financial self-sufficiency of low-income motivated families.

Over the last two years we successfully conducted afterschool Kids’ STEM clubs and summer day camps, which brought robotics activities and instruction to more than 150 elementary to middle school aged children. These children, who are at-risk of underperforming in school because of socio-economic factors, demonstrate sincere excitement about STEM subjects in school because of these programs. They show a greater interest in school and ultimately in pursuing STEM in higher education and careers. 

Also, collaborating with the Housing Opportunities Commission (HOC) and thanks to competitive grant funding, Community Partners helped more than 200 low-income working families purchase refurbished vehicles propelling them to greater self-sufficiency. Community Partners has helped 300 homeless families obtain stable, permanent housing. We have provided job search, life and soft skills training services to hundreds of adults helping many of them to secure employment. Furthermore, we have empowered 30 low-income families to open an individual development account matching their savings so they can purchase a home, pursue education and/or start a small business. Also, 17 foster youth successfully transitioned into independence and are still in stable housing. 

Recognizing that low-income residents living in subsidized housing under the Housing Opportunities Commission (HOC) were experiencing a variety of unmet social service needs, leaders from HOC and the general community teamed together in 1999 to form Community Partners, in order to create targeted programs to help families with children, seniors and people with disabilities living in subsidized housing improve their quality of life.

 

Our programs help to equip low-income children to succeed in school, help homeless families obtain permanent housing, assist low-income working families with purchasing refurbished vehicles, teach unemployed HOC residents the necessary skills for success in the job market, transition foster youth to independent living and increase the financial self-sufficiency of low-income motivated families.

 

Over the last two years we successfully conducted afterschool Kids’ STEM clubs and summer day camps, which brought robotics activities and instruction to more than 150 elementary to middle school aged children. These children, who are at-risk of underperforming in school because of socio-economic factors, demonstrate sincere excitement about STEM subjects in school because of these programs. They show a greater interest in school and ultimately in pursuing STEM in higher education and careers. 

 

Also, collaborating with the Housing Opportunities Commission (HOC) and thanks to competitive grant funding, Community Partners helped more than 200 low-income working families purchase refurbished vehicles propelling them to greater self-sufficiency. Community Partners has helped 300 homeless families obtain stable, permanent housing. We have provided job search, life and soft skills training services to hundreds of adults helping many of them to secure employment. Furthermore, we have empowered 30 low-income families to open an individual development account matching their savings so they can purchase a home, pursue education and/or start a small business. Also, 17 foster youth successfully transitioned into independence and are still in stable housing.